Live Chat ×
Skip to main content

107R-19: Cost Estimate Classification System – As Applied in Engineering, Procurement, and Construction for the Environmental Remediation Industries

107R-19: Cost Estimate Classification System – As Applied in Engineering, Procurement, and Construction for the Environmental Remediation Industries
AACE International, August 7, 2020

Price: $0 (Member) / $100 (Non-Member)

As a recommended practice (RP) of AACE International, the Cost Estimate Classification System provides guidelines for applying the general principles of estimate classification to project cost estimates (i.e., cost estimates that are used to evaluate, approve, and/or fund projects). The Cost Estimate Classification System maps the phases and stages of environmental remediation project cost estimating together with a generic project scope definition maturity and quality matrix, which can be applied across a wide variety of environmental remediation industries.

This recommended practice provides guidelines for applying the principles of estimate classification specifically to project estimates for engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) work for environmental remediation industries. It supplements the generic cost estimate classification RP 17R-97 by providing:
• A section that further defines classification concepts as they apply to environmental remediation industries.
• A chart that maps the extent and maturity of estimate input information (project definition deliverables) against the class of estimate.

This RP focuses on Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial projects and United States Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action projects, as well as decontamination and demolition (D&D), ordnance and explosives cleanups, and other environmental cleanup work. This RP includes estimates for work encompassing the entire environmental remediation life cycle and thus could be applied to cost estimates for closure/post-closure of regulated facilities (e.g., hazardous waste facilities under RCRA); mine reclamation; asbestos abatement prior to demolition of a building. In addition, this legislative framework can be applied towards both local as well as international laws and regulations that follow similar processes for contaminated site characterization, cleanup and closure.

[Look Inside]