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Ask the Expert: Teratogenicity Prevention

Activity provided by the American Epilepsy Society.
Recording date: June 20, 2017
Activity Launch date: June 28, 2017
Expiration date (nursing credits): June 28, 2019
Expiration date (physician and participation credits): June 28, 2020

Overview
Approximately one-quarter of patients with active epilepsy are females of childbearing age which necessitates treatment with medications that are known teratogens. Women of childbearing age who are exposed to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are potentially increasing risks of congenital anomalies or birth defects.
Prescription drug exposure is a preventable cause of congenital malformation in infants and the precise risks for most AEDs and AED combinations are unknown. As a care providers, you must consider the benefits and risks of AEDs for your patients, including benefits of seizure reductions and risks of teratogenicity when recommending treatment options.

Join this interactive webinar to learn more about options to reduce risks of teratogenicity, including AED dose optimization, vitamin supplementation and contraceptive options and how to explain teratogenic risk of AEDs on fetal development.

References:
Meador KJ, Loring DW. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations. Neurology. 2016;86(3):297-306. doi:10.1212/WNL.0000000000002119.
Pennell PB. Too Complicated or So Simple: AED Type and AED Dose Matter for Pregnancy. Epilepsy Currents. 2012;12(2):63-65. doi:10.5698/1535-7511-12.2.63.

Learning Objectives
Following participation in this activity, the learner should be able to:

  • consider the benefits and risks of AEDs, including benefits of seizure reductions and risks of teratogenicity when recommending treatment options.
  • identify AEDs with high teratogenic risk.
  • explain teratogenic risk of AEDs on fetal development.
  • discuss options to reduce risks of teratogenicity, including AED dose optimization, vitamin supplementation and contraceptive options.

Target Audience:
Epileptologists, neurologists, pharmacologists, advanced practice providers, nurses and epilepsy specialist allied health professionals

Accreditation
The American Epilepsy Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the Montana Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

For more information regarding contact hours, please contact American Epilepsy Society staff.

DISCLAIMER
This CME activity is for educational purposes only and does not constitute the opinion or endorsement of, or promotion by, the American Epilepsy Society. Reasonable efforts have been taken to present educational subject matter in a balanced, unbiased fashion, and in compliance with regulatory requirements. However, each activity participant must always use his or her own personal and professional judgment when considering further application of this information, particularly as it may relate to patient diagnostic or treatment decisions including, without limitation, FDA-approved uses and any off-label, investigational and/or experimental uses.