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09.14.20 | Integration: lighting controls, HVAC, and beyond

Significant energy savings can be achieved by turning off HVAC when spaces are unoccupied. In the past, carbon dioxide was used as a proxy for occupancy, but energy savings only made sense for high occupancy spaces with transient use (e.g. conference rooms). With the ubiquity of lighting controls, facilitated by Title 24-2013, turning off HVAC systems with a signal from the occupancy sensor is becoming the trendy way to save energy in advanced buildings. But just because you can use them doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to do. Inadequate detailing and specifications, poor coordination between trades, and a siloed maintenance team are but some of the torpedoes that will sink the grand vision of an integrated system.
Lyn will share views on the advantages and disadvantages – including huge implications for maintenance – of four different ways to implement occupancy based ventilation on your projects. This presentation includes examples of the challenges and complexities encountered when designing and building integrated systems. Solutions based on real-world experience in implementing advanced lighting controls projects and integrating them into HVAC control systems will also be included.