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"Sexual Intelligence: A New View of Sexual Function and Satisfaction" - 6 CE Hours, Presented by Marty Klein, PhD

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Workshop Description:
What do most people say they want from sex? Pleasure and closeness—but that’s not what most men and women focus on before or during sex. Everyone agrees that “communication” is a key part of sex—but very few people really do it effectively or honestly. Fearing rejection or judgment, most people reject, withhold, and disguise parts of their own sexuality—hoping their partner won’t have a chance to do it. People make sex very complicated, and then blame sex. Or their imperfect bodies.
And then people come to us for help. But if we try to improve “functioning” we can actually make things worse. Better friction doesn’t give people what they really want from sex: a sense of relaxation, playfulness, self-acceptance, and connection. Erections and lubrication don’t guarantee desire or satisfaction. And so treating people’s genitalia is the wrong approach to enhancing passion or pleasure.
People need more Sexual Intelligence. We need to define and explain this to our clients, and help them develop it. We need to get them more focused on satisfaction than on function. We need to help clients unravel the myths about sex, bodies, and gender that keep them stuck with less intimacy, less connection, and less validation than they deserve. In this seminar you’ll learn how to do that.
After all, sex is more than an activity—it’s an idea.

Learning Objectives:
At seminar completion, participants will be able to:
1. Identify and discuss patients’ and couples’ narratives about their sexuality;
2. Assess why people don’t desire or initiate sex;
3. Describe and use an alternative to the function-dysfunction model of sexuality;
4. Prepare men and women to discover and discuss their authentic sexual desires;
5. Describe why orgasm is not the most important part of sexual experience;
6. Describe why reassuring patients that they’re sexually normal often undermines them rather than empowering them.