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Keeping up with Speed Management

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State and national policies are trending towards greater flexibility in speed limit setting, which requires new strategies for setting appropriate speed limits.

This session brings together researchers and practitioners to discuss new guidance, best practices, and equity considerations in managing speeds. It includes a case study of how systemic approaches to speed limit setting can succeed.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the latest research and tools for setting context-sensitive speed limits
  • Discuss the strategies adopted by cities to improve safety by lowering vehicle speeds
  • Assess how speed enforcement can be balanced with concerns over policing
Speakers:
  • Kay Fitzpatrick, Ph.D, Senior Research Engineer, Texas A&M Transportation Institute
    • NCHRP 17-76: Guidance for the Setting of Speed Limits.
  • Dongho Chang, City Traffic Engineer, Seattle Department of Transportation
    • Citywide Speed Limit Setting in Seattle
  • Karina Schneider, Transportation Planner, Fehr & Peers
    • Equity Considerations in Speed Enforcement
  • Brian Chandler, National Director for Transportation Safety, DKS Associates
    • Posted Speed Limits: Applying New Research to Old Roads
PDH/CM Credits Available: 1.5
To earn your credits, you must view the session and complete the associated evaluation. Once your evaluation is completed, your certificate will be available in your ITE Learning Hub account.

Contributors

  • Moderator: Priyanka Alluri, Associate Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Florida International University

  • Kay Fitzpatrick, Ph.D, Senior Research Engineer, Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    Kay Fitzpatrick is a Senior Research Engineer with the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Her research interests include pedestrian treatments, roadway geometric design, traffic control devices, roadway safety, and the effects of posted speed limits on safety and operations. Her work has influenced changes in the TxDOT Roadway Design Manual, FHWA MUTCD, and the AASHTO Green Book.

  • Dongho Chang, City Traffic Engineer, Seattle Department of Transportation

    Dongho Chang is the City Traffic Engineer for Seattle. He has worked over 29 years in the transportation engineering field focused on improving safety and mobility for all travel modes. Dongho has worked as the Traffic Engineer for City of Everett and Area Engineer for Washington State Department of Transportation where he was responsible for traffic signals group, traffic analysis and channelization review, and traffic safety program. Dongho is active with Institute of Transportation Engineers and NACTO. Dongho drove a Zamboni during high school, which he considers as his “coolest” job ever!

  • Karina Schneider, Transportation Planner, Fehr & Peers

    Karina Schneider is a transportation planner in Oakland, CA dedicated to providing mobility options and solutions to all. After completing a Master’s in Urban & Regional Planning from the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, Karina joined Fehr & Peers and now serves as a project manager and task lead for multimodal projects throughout the Bay Area. Karina is interested in transportation work that centers people and improves access for underserved communities. She is active in equity research and best practices through the firm’s Equity Technical Initiative and is the Equity Champion for the Oakland office.

  • Brian Chandler, National Director for Transportation Safety, DKS Associates

    Brian Chandler is the National Director for Transportation Safety at DKS Associates in Seattle, Washington. He brings real-world experience in roadway safety planning, traffic operations, safety management, and data analysis, including a rare combination of leadership positions in State government, Federal government, and the private sector. Brian spends each day seeking new and innovative ways to analyze data, implement solutions, and revise public policy to save lives.

March 23, 2021
Tue 1:30 PM EDT

Duration 1H 30M

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