Skip to main content

Adapting to New Challenges: How to Transition a City’s Parking Division to a Progressive Curbside Management Program

Thank you

The live event has ended. Recording now available to stream. 

With the evolution of shared mobility, commercial docking, and pending connected and automated vehicle (CAV) demands competing with traditional parking at the curb, many cities have started to redefine their curbside management practices. This session will guide participants on how to assess their jurisdiction’s ability to manage this change, mapping a path forward towards a successful curbside management program. Attendees will also have the opportunity to use a tool to self-assess their jurisdiction’s parking / curbside management program.

Learning Objectives

  • Define a successful, sustainable curbside management program
  • Understand which elements of a street’s right-of-way should be considered when assessing a curbside management program
  • Summarize the toolbox and methods to achieve sustainable curb use
Speakers
  • Benito O. Pérez, AICP CTP CPM CAPP, Curbside Management & Operations Planning Manager, District Department of Transportation and David Carson Lipscomb,Curbside Management Planner, District Department of Transportation
  • Mary Catherine Snyder,Parking Strategist, Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Michael Sawyer,City Transportation Engineer and Vision Zero Coordinator, City of Richmond, Virginia
  • Graham Young, Complete Streets Manager, City of Baltimore, Maryland
PDH/CM Credits Available: 1.5
To earn your credits, you must view the session and complete the associated evaluation. Once your evaluation is completed, your certificate will be available in your ITE Learning Hub account.

Contributors

  • Moderator: Lawrence Marcus, Founder, Forward Progress, LLC

  • Benito O. Pérez, AICP CTP CPM CAPP, Curbside Management & Operations Planning Manager, District Department of Transportation

    Benito O. Pérez, AICP CTP CPM CAPP is a Curbside Management & Operations Planning Manager with the District Department of Transportation. In his capacity, he works on managing a team involved with creating, accessing, analyzing, visualizing, disseminating, and working with stakeholders to leverage data for policy development, resource allocation, and operations management of the District’s curbside. Mr. Pérez earned his Master of Arts in Urban Planning and Master of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Florida in 2009.

  • David Carson Lipscomb, Curbside Management Planner, District Department of Transportation

    David Lipscomb is the Curbside Management Planner at the District Department of Transportation (DDOT). In this role, David is responsible for facilitating the safe and efficient transfer of people and goods to and from the curbside. His major projects include planning and evaluating motorcoach parking, managing DDOT’s pick-up/drop-off (PUDO) zone pilot program, parking sign redesign, and neighborhood curbside management planning. David has a master’s degree in Community Planning from the University of Maryland, College Park. Additionally, David has more than a decade of experience in journalism and communications. David is a District native and has long term interests in multimodal transportation planning.

  • Mary Catherine Snyder, Parking Strategist, Seattle Department of Transportation

    Mary Catherine Snyder is a Parking Strategist for the City of Seattle Department of Transportation and lead for the Policy group in SDOT’s Curbside Management Team. Over the last twenty plus years at the city, Mary Catherine has worked on a variety of policy, program, and technology projects related to managing curbspace in the public right-of-way. With her team, she manages several curbspace policy and technology programs, including mobile parking payment, urban goods delivery strategy, neighborhood parking and access planning, and the Performance-Based Parking Pricing Program, which is SDOT’s data-driven rate-setting process for Seattle’s paid parking system. She has an undergrad degree in Government from Cornell University, and masters’ degrees in Urban Planning and Transportation Planning from the University of Washington.

  • Michael Sawyer, City Transportation Engineer and Vision Zero Coordinator, City of Richmond, Virginia

    Michael Sawyer has nearly 30 years of experience in transportation engineering work in the private sector as well as the local, state, regional, tribal, and federal levels of government. He currently serves as the City Transportation Engineer for the City of Richmond, VA and is designated as the City’s Vision Zero Coordinator. Previously, he served as the State Highway Safety Engineer with the Virginia Department of Transportation. He emphasizes that transportation should serve all users within the City and in particular serve transportation disadvantaged communities who are disabled, elderly, or low income.

  • Graham Young, Complete Streets Manager, City of Baltimore, Maryland

    Graham Young is a professional traffic operations engineer in the role of the Complete Streets Manager for the Baltimore City Department of Transportation. His background includes experience in the private and public sector, specializing in traffic engineering and multimodal facility planning, modeling, and design. Through his career in Baltimore City, he has overseen the design and implementation of a network of dedicated bus lanes, protected bike lanes, traffic calming projects, and the development of Baltimore City’s Complete Streets Manual.

March 23, 2021
Tue 4:00 PM EDT

Duration 1H 30M

This live web event has ended.

You can access this item by buying entire course

Buy entire course: