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In Their Own Words: Video Introduction from the Authors

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Contributors

  • David Y. Hwang, MD

    David Y. Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology at the Yale School of Medicine and a neurointensivist at Yale-New Haven Hospital. A native of Memphis, Tennessee, he earned his BS in Chemistry at Emory University and his MD at Harvard Medical School. He completed his residency in neurology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, serving as chief resident in his final year. He then completed a fellowship in neurocritical care at the same institutions before joining the Yale faculty in 2012.

    Dr. Hwang’s academic interests include how clinicians prognosticate outcome for intracerebral hemorrhage patients and how surrogate decision making in neurocritical care can be improved. He is a recent recipient of the American Brain Foundation Practice Research Training Fellowship, the NCS Research Training Fellowship, the Robert G. Siekert New Investigator Award at the International Stroke Conference, the First-Place Patient and Family Support Abstract Award at the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Critical Care Congress, and an Outstanding Oral Presentation Award at the NCS Research Conference. He is currently co-chair of the NCS Educational Products Committee and is a faculty member for the ongoing SCCM PCOR-ICU Collaborative that is promoting family-centered care across U.S. ICUs.

  • Dayla Maisey, BSc

    Dayla’s own journey inspired this book. She was moved to write after her brother was critically brain injured in a motorcycle crash. As the narrator of this book, she integrates the technical, the practical, the emotional, and the spiritual to help you navigate your way through the intensely stressful, fast-paced, high tech environment of the ICU and beyond.

    Dayla presents nationally and internationally at conferences, hospitals and retreats to a variety of audiences including physicians, nurses, lawyers, social workers, family members and people with brain injury. She has worked with various levels of government as an advocate for those with brain injury, their families and their friends. She has contributed to numerous councils, boards and committees, and presented at the “Visionary Leadership that Makes a Difference at the United Nations” conference in New York City. Her formal education includes a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Calgary.

    Dayla was also awarded an Honorary Master’s Degree, from Sociedade Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva (SOBRATI – The Brazilian Society of Critical Care) based on her work on behalf of families and humanization of the intensive care unit.