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Disability Rights in a Pandemic – Maintaining Compliance and Inclusion

Description

The pandemic has changed higher education dramatically in the past year. It has also changed the landscape for college students with disabilities. This session will explore how the Americans with Disabilities Act applies under these changed circumstances – from admissions to online learning to exams to graduation requirements – whether they be temporary or permanent. Join us to learn more about higher education’s responsibility to students with mental health conditions and how disability resource offices can respond to issues of access and inclusion for these students as our institutions continue to evolve in response to the new “normal.”

Contributors

  • Eve Hill

    Eve Hill, J.D. is a Partner at the law firm of Brown Goldstein & Levy and a Principal with Inclusivity Strategic Consulting. She is a nationally known disability rights advocate and expert on disability and civil rights law. Prior to joining the firm, Ms. Hill was Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Justice, where she was a member of the Civil Rights Division’s leadership team and was responsible for oversight of the Division’s disability rights enforcement, educational civil rights enforcement, Title VI interagency coordination and the American Indian Working Group. Highlights of Ms. Hill’s work at the Department include participating as part of the negotiating team for the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled; filing briefs and developing guidance supporting the rights of refugees, limited English proficient students, and transgender students; testifying before Senate Committees; enforcing ADA requirements for websites and other digital technology; implementing Olmstead community integration requirements in residential, employment and education settings; and enforcing civil rights in education, law enforcement, employment, public services, and health care contexts.

  • Jennifer Mathis

    Jennifer Mathis, J.D. is Deputy Legal Director and Director of Policy and Legal Advocacy of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law where she engages in litigation and policy advocacy to promote community integration of individuals with mental disabilities, other non-discrimination work under the ADA and Section 504, and the Medicaid rights of adults and children with disabilities. Ms. Mathis helped coordinate the amicus briefs filed in the Supreme Court in the case of Olmstead v. L.C. She also served on the team of disability community negotiators who worked with the business community to craft what became the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. Ms. Mathis serves as special assistant to EEOC Commissioner Chai Feldblum in 2010-2011 to help draft regulations implementing the ADAAA. Before joining the Bazelon Center, Ms. Mathis conducted litigation involving ADA, Section 504, the Fair Housing Act, and Title XIX claims with the Disabilities Law Project in Pittsburgh. She also practiced with a private law firm where she pursued litigation on a broad range of civil rights issues. Ms. Mathis holds an A.B. from Harvard University, an M.A. from New York University, and a J. D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

April 8, 2021
Thu 3:00 PM EDT

Duration 1H 30M

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