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Considering Traffic Signals for All Users

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Are traffic signals primarily just for vehicles? No, and there are methods for using pedestrian and bicycle data from a variety of sources to improve the safety, accessibility, overall experience of non-motorized users of signalized intersections.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe methods to estimate pedestrian volumes with traffic signal data.
  • Summarize microsimulation methods to determine vehicle-bicycle conflicts.
  • Identify improvements to support accessible intersections and the implications of connecting vehicle transit service on pedestrian safety.

Moderator: Andy Swisher, P.E., PTOE, Project Manager, HR Green

Presentation Titles & Speakers:
  • Examining the Use of Microsimulation Modeling to Assess Bicycle-Vehicle Conflicts at Intersections: A Case Study Incorporating Field-Observed Conflict Data”, Edward Smaglik, Ph.D, P.E., Professor, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona and Brendan Russo, Assistant Professor, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona
  • “Safety Improvements for Blind Pedestrians at Signalized Intersections”, Gerard Soffian, P.E., RSP1, Adjunct Professor, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York
  • “Challenges in the Deployment of a Connected Vehicle Transit System to Improve Pedestrian Safety at Signalized Intersections”, Srinivasa Sunkari, P.E., PMP, Research Engineer, Texas A&M Transportation Institute, Bryan, Texas
  • Pedestrian traffic signal data: Models for estimating pedestrian volumes”, Patrick Singleton, Ph.D, Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Logan, Utah and Ferdousy Runa, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania

Contributors

  • Moderator: Andy Swisher, P.E., PTOE, Project Manager, HR Green

  • Edward Smaglik, Ph.D, P.E., Professor, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona

    Dr. Edward J. Smaglik, P.E., is a Professor at Northern Arizona University (NAU), Flagstaff, AZ, in the Department of Civil Engineering, Construction Management, and Environmental Engineering. The Director of AZTrans: The Arizona Laboratory for Applied Transportation Research, Dr. Smaglik has over 14 years of academic research and teaching experience, preceded by two years of experience as a post-doctoral research associate and six years as a graduate assistant. Dr. Smaglik has served as the Principal Investigator on transportation related projects over a wide range of topics in this discipline, including improving pedestrian operations and reducing bicycle conflicts at signalized intersections to provide for a more livable environment for all users, mitigating special event congestion through the use of ITS technologies, the development of a sustainable traffic counting device, improving safety on free flow facilities using ITS technologies, investigating the impacts of alternative vehicle detection devices on adaptive traffic control, and the evaluation of emerging transportation technologies.

  • Brendan Russo, Assistant Professor, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona

    Dr. Brendan Russo is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Northern Arizona University, where he also serves as Associate Director of AZTrans: The Arizona Laboratory for Applied Transportation Research. Dr. Russo has over 13 years of transportation-related research, teaching, and professional work experience, and he holds a B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering with a focus in Transportation from Iowa State University. His research is primarily focused on transportation safety; specifically safety performance and economic assessments of roadway design features, pedestrian and bicyclist safety, road user behavior, and econometric methods for transportation data analysis. He is a member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), the Transportation Research Board (TRB) ACS10 Transportation Safety Management Systems Committee (also serving as the Committee Research Coordinator), the TRB AKD20 Roadside Safety Design Committee, and is a registered Professional Engineer in Arizona.

  • Gerard Soffian, P.E., RSP1, Adjunct Professor, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York

    Gerard Soffian currently serves as Chair of the ITE Vision Zero Standing Committee. He works as an adjunct professor at NYU Tandon School of Engineering where he instructs graduate school engineering students in issues associated with transportation safety and security utilizing the streets of New York City as class laboratory. Mr. Soffian also provides engineering services related to traffic and transit design and operations at Sam Schwartz Engineering.
    Mr. Soffian served as Deputy Commissioner, Traffic Operations, New York City Department of Transportation where he managed a staff of 1,400 engineers, planners, technicians, electricians, field and administrative personnel with an annual budget of $900 million dedicated to protecting safety and mobility of the travelling public. Mr. Soffian earned a B.S. in Physics from Brooklyn College, M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kentucky and public administration at University of Southern California.

  • Patrick Singleton, Ph.D, Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Logan, Utah

    Dr. Patrick Singleton is an Assistant Professor of Transportation in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Utah State University. His research spans the areas of travel behavior, transportation planning, travel demand modeling, and traffic safety, specializing in active transportation. Patrick earned his BS from the University of Pittsburgh and his MS and PhD from Portland State University.

  • Srinivasa Sunkari, P.E., PMP, Research Engineer, Texas A&M Transportation Institute, Bryan, Texas

    Mr. Srinivasa Sunkari is a Research Engineer at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute and has over 26 years of experience as a professional engineer and a researcher in the field of traffic signal operations, hardware-in-the-loop simulation, and Connected Vehicle Initiatives. He was also one of the contributing authors of the first version and the second version of the FHWA’s Traffic Signal Manual and a key researcher that developed the Signal Timing Handbook for the Texas Department of Transportation. He holds a B.S., Civil Engineering from Osmania University and an M.S., Civil Engineering from Texas A&M University.

July 27, 2021
Tue 11:00 AM EDT

Duration 1H 30M

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