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CR-RSCH-06: Implementing Classroom-Based AAC Instruction for Beginning Communicators with Significant Disabilities

Overview
This session will briefly review an approach to teaching symbolic communication to students with significant cognitive disabilities who are learning to use a core vocabulary approach to aided AAC. Descriptive data from 50 classrooms implementing the approach with nearly 200 students over two years will be presented.

Content Disclosure: Please note that this session is focused on Project Core, a grant funded by the US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (#H327S140017), and there will be limited or no information provided about similar research projects. Project Core is aimed at students with significant cognitive disabilities who have limited use of language and could benefit from augmentative
communication systems. Project Core is specifically focused on the needs of students who do not yet use speech, signs or symbols to communicate for a range of purposes, on a variety of topics, with many different communication partners.

Learning Objectives

  • First Learning Objective: Identify 5 components of the Project Core implementation program.
  • Second Learning Objective: Describe 3 teacher outcomes of the Project Core implementation program.
  • Third Learning Objective: Discuss 2 changes in student communication ability as measured by the Communication Matrix after two years of participation in Project Core.
Strand
Research

Target Audience
Communication Specialist; Curriculum and Instruction; Educators; Speech-Language Pathologists; Special Education Educators

Experience Level
Intermediate

Content Area
Professional Area

ATIA 2020 Conference Recording

This course was given at the ATIA 2020 Conference on Friday, January 31, 2020 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Continuing Education Credits
For Satisfactory Completion and Continuing Education information, please visit: ATIA Online Education CEUs

Start date of ASHA CEUs offering: 4/1/2020
Type: ASHA
Number of ASHA CEU Hours: 1.0 Number of ASHA CEUs: 0.1

This course is offered for 0.1 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level, Professional area).

This course is also offered for the following CE Provider Credits:
AOTA; IACET
For: 0.1 CEU Units.

Speaker/s:
Sofia Benson-Goldberg
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sofia Benson-Goldberg is a speech-language pathologist who is pursuing her PhD at UNC - Chapel Hill and working as a research assistant at the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies. She has worked with families of children and adolescents who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for 5 years.
Relevant Financial Relationship: Yes
Salary from employment
Relevant Non-Financial Relationship: No


Kathryn Dorney
UNC at Chapel Hill
Kathryn Dorney MA, CCC-SLP is a Ph.D. student at the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at the University of North Carolina. She is a practicing speech-language pathologist with 20 years’ experience working within preschool special education programs and families’ homes with students with autism and multiple disabilities. Ms. Dorney has presented the findings of the present study as a poster session at ATIA in 2018 and the North Carolina Speech, Hearing & Language Association Annual Conference in 2018.
Relevant Financial Relationship: Yes
Kathryn E. Dorney is a PhD candidate and research assistant employed by The Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Relevant Non-Financial Relationship: No

Lori Geist
Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, UNC Chapel Hill
Lori Geist, Ph.D., CCC-SLP (UNC-CH) is a research assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her training and experience include more than two decades of work experience in AAC and severe disabilities and a PhD in Computing Technology in Education. From 2005-2013, Lori was a senior manager for DynaVox Technologies where she led several large-scale research and development projects. Since starting at UNC, she has served as the director for two Stepping Up Technology Implementation grants from the U.S. Dept of Education, Office of Special Education programs, leading all aspects of iterative development, data collection, analysis, and dissemination. Dr. Geist has served as the chair of the Assistive Technology Industry Association Research Committee (2014-2019), which includes leading researchers from universities and industry and works to advance the field through effective partnerships. Dr. Geist is the Project Director of Project Core, a grant funded by the US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (#H327S140017), which will be described as part of this presentation. Dr. Geist has no other financial or personal conflicts of interest related to this presentation.
Relevant Financial Relationship: Yes
Salary from the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies Grant funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant No. H327S140017; Registration fees waived by ATIA for work as a research strand advisor
Relevant Non-Financial Relationship: No

Claire Greer
Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Claire Greer, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, in the Department of Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked for the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction as Consultant for Autism, Severe Intellectual Disabilities and Multiple Disabilities and was the Director of the North Carolina Deaf-Blind Project. She has also worked for the States of North Carolina, Kentucky and Wyoming as a Classroom Teacher, Program Specialist, Educational Director, and Exceptional Children Consultant.
Relevant Financial Relationship: Yes
I receive a salary from my employer the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Relevant Non-Financial Relationship: No